The Honorable Alice Beck Dubow

Judge Alice Beck Dubow, the granddaughter of Russian Jewish immigrants, did not have to look far to find shining examples of public service and high achievement to lead her on her own path of accomplishment as a respected litigator in private practice, public law, and a distinguished jurist.

Her father, Aaron Beck was the son of an immigrant union printer from Providence. He earned admittance to Brown University and Yale Medical School where he studied psychiatry. Eventually he became one of the most respected psychiatrists in the United States, and is universally recognized as the father of Cognitive Behavioral Therapy.

In criminal cases,
Judge Dubow has found that making difficult sentencing decisions is predicated on the distinction between defendants who show a pattern of criminal behavior and are a threat to the community and those defendants who had lived productive lives before committing a crime, deserving a measure of consideration and compassion.

Judge Beck Dubow's mother, the Honorable Phyllis Beck, holds degrees from Brown University and Temple Law School and served as vice dean at the University of Pennsylvania Law School. In 1983, Judge Phyllis Beck made history as the first woman elected to the Pennsylvania Superior Court.

At Lower Merion High School, Judge Dubow was an honor student and served as captain of the girl’s tennis team. She went on to excel academically at the University of Pennsylvania where she graduated with honors and was admitted to the University of Pennsylvania Law School.

With a degree from Penn Law, Judge Dubow started her legal career in 1984 as a law clerk for a judge of the Court of Common Pleas in Bucks County before taking a position with Duane Morris and Heckscher, practicing commercial litigation.  In 1987, she joined the firm Fineman & Bach as an associate and carved out a niche as both a trial and appellate court litigator.

In 1992, Judge Dubow began her public service as an Assistant City Solicitor for the City of Philadelphia. She was eventually promoted to Divisional Deputy City Solicitor and developed an expertise in tax law.

In 1997 she joined the firm Wolf Block and specialized in local and state tax law for two years. In addition to representing a variety of clients, she co-authored a book on Pennsylvania Corporate Tax.  In 2000, she left Wolf Block to become a lawyer for Drexel University, eventually becoming Deputy General Counsel.  

In 2007, Judge Dubow was elected to the Philadelphia Court of Common Pleas. Her judicial tenure includes presiding over cases concerning abused and neglected children; personal injury and malpractice cases; and criminal trials.

In family court she developed a keen understanding of the effects that trauma causes children, the biological attachment children have to their parents, and the impact drug addiction and mental health issues have on families. Drawing from her judicial experience, she co-authored a book for judges compiling research on childhood trauma.

In criminal cases, Judge Dubow has found that making difficult sentencing decisions is predicated on the distinction between defendants who show a pattern of criminal behavior and are a threat to the community and those defendants who had lived productive lives before committing a crime, deserving a measure of consideration and compassion.

 As an attorney, Judge Dubow performed pro bono work representing indigent clients through Volunteers for Indigent Persons (VIP), an organization that provides training for lawyers performing pro bono work. When she was elected Judge, VIP recruited her to be a board member.

Judge Dubow lives in Philadelphia with her husband Rob Dubow whom she met her freshman year at Penn.  

While two dogs still reside at the Dubow home, son and daughter Benjamin and Rebecca are living and working in New York.

 

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